Wash U Crest
Department of Political Science
BRIAN F. CRISP
   
Associate Professor of Political Science

Department of Political Science
Washington University
Campus Box 1063
One Brookings Drive
St. Louis, MO 63130

VOICE 314.935.4724
FAX 314.935.5856
EMAIL crisp@wustl.edu

Office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 2:30 to 4:00 or by appointment
 
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Curriculum Vitae
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Brian F. Crisp

BRIAN F. CRISP


Associate Professor

Washington University in Saint Louis



Personal:



  • Home Address & Phone


6338 Waterman Avenue, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130-4707

(314) 863-1780

  • Work Address & Phone


Department of Political Science, Campus Box 1063, 219 Eliot Hall,

One Brookings Drive

Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missori, 63130-4899

(314) 935-5810

  • E-mail


crisp@wustl.edu

  • Date of Birth


December 9, 1962


Education:



  • Ph.D.


University of Michigan; 1992; Political Science; Major: Comparative Politics;

1st Minor: World Politics; 2nd Minor: Methodology

Doctoral Dissertation: Tyranny by the Minority: Institutional Control of

Participation in the Venezuelan Democracy

Dissertation Adviser: Dr. Daniel H. Levine

  • B.A.


Hope College; 1985; Major: Political Science; Minor: Spanish




Professional Experience:



  • Associate Professor


Department of Political Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO

July 2004 - present

  • Director of Graduate
    Studies


Department of Political Science, University of Arizona; Tucson, AZ

August 2000 - July 2004

  • Associate Professor


Department of Political Science, University of Arizona; Tucson, AZ

August 1999 - July 2004

  • Assistant Professor


Department of Political Science, University of Arizona; Tucson, AZ

August 1995 - July 1999

  • Visiting Faculty Fellow


The Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies; University of Notre

Dame; Notre Dame, IN January - May 1996

  • Assistant Professor


Department of Politics, Wake Forest University; Winston-Salem, NC

August 1991 - July 1995

  • Instructor


Department of Political Science, University of Michigan; Ann Arbor, MI,

Summer 1991

Comparative Government and Politics

  • Visiting Researcher


Instituto Internacional de Estudios Avanzados; Caracas, Venezuela 

September 1989 - August 1990

  • Visiting Researcher


Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administración; Caracas Venezuela

September 1989 - August 1990

  • Research Associate


Center for Research on Economic Development; University of Michigan Ann

Arbor, MI May 1988 - May 1989


Research, Publication, and Other Professional Activity

Publications:

Books

  • Crisp, Brian F. 2000. Democratic Institutional Design: The Powers and Incentives of Venezuelan Politicians and Interest Groups. Stanford: Stanford University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1997. Control Institucional de la Participación en la Democracia Venezolana. Caracas: Editorial Jurídica Venezolana.

Articles

  • Crisp, Brian F. 2008. "Incentives in Mixed-Member Electoral Systems: General Election Laws, Candidate Selection Procedures, and Cameral Rules." Comparative Political Studies 41(8).
  • Crisp, Brian F., Kristin Kanthak, and Jenny Leijonhufvud. 2004. "The Reputations Legislators Build: With Whom Should Representatives Collaborate." American Political Science Review 98(4): 703-716.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Felipe Botero. 2004. "Multi-Country Studies of Latin American Legislatures." Legislative Studies Quarterly 29(3): 329-356.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Maria C. Escobar-Lemmon, Bradford S. Jones, Mark P. Jones, and Michelle M. Taylor-Robinson. 2004. "Electoral Incentives and Legislative Representation in Six Presidential Democracies." The Journal of Politics 66(3): 823-46.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Scott W. Desposato. 2004. "Constituency Building in Multimember Districts: Collusion or Conflict?" The Journal of Politics 66(1): 136-156.
  • Johnson, Gregg B. and Brian F. Crisp. 2003. "Mandates, Powers, and Policies." American Journal of Political Science 47(1): 127-141.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Rachael E. Ingall. 2002. "Institutional Engineering and the Nature of Representation: Mapping the Effects of Electoral Reform in Colombia." American Journal of Political Science 46(4): 733-748.
  • Ingall, Rachael E., and Brian F. Crisp. 2001. "Determinants of Home Style: The Many Incentives for Going Home in Colombia." Legislative Studies Quarterly 26(3): 487-511.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Maria C. Escobar-Lemmon. 2001. "Democracy in Latin America: Individuals in Institutional Contexts." Latin American Research Review 36(2): 175-192.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Michael J. Kelly. 1999. "The Socioeconomic Impacts of Structural Adjustment." International Studies Quarterly 43(3): 533-52.
  • Levine, Daniel H., and Brian F. Crisp. 1999. "Venezuela: The Character, Crisis and Possible Future of Democracy." World Affairs 161(Winter): 123-65. (Also appears as chapter listed below.)
  • Crisp, Brian F., 1998. "El Sistema Electoral Venezolano y las Relaciones Entre los Poderes Gubernmentales." Cuestiones Políticas 21: 11-46.
  • Crisp, Brian F., 1998. "Development Strategy and Regime Type: Why Doesn’t Democracy Matter?" Studies in Comparative International Development 33(1): 8-41.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Daniel H. Levine. 1998. "Democratizing the Democracy: Crisis and Reform in Venezuela." Journal of Interamerican Studies and World Affairs 40(2): 27-61.
    (Listed below as chapter reprinted in Mexico, Central and South America: New Perspectives Volume 2: Democracy)
  • Crisp, Brian F., 1998. "Lessons from Economic Reform in the Venezuelan Democracy." Latin American Research Review 33(1):7-43.
  • Crisp, Brian F., 1996. "The Rigidity of Democratic Institutions and the Current Legitimacy Crisis in Venezuela." Latin American Perspectives. 23(3):30-49.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Daniel H. Levine, and Juan Carlos Rey. 1996. "El Problema de Legitimidad." Cuestiones Políticas 16:5-43. (Also appears in English as chapter listed below.)
  • Crisp, Brian F., 1994. "Limitations to Democracy in Developing Capitalist Societies: The Case of Venezuela." World Development 22:1491-1509.

Articles Under Review

  • Crisp, Brian F., Maria C. Escobar-Lemmon, Bradford S. Jones, Mark P. Jones, and Michelle M. Taylor-Robinson.  "The Electoral Connection and Institutionalization of the Legislature in Systems with Strong Presidents."
  • Crisp, Brian F., Kathryn M. Jensen, and Yael Shomer. "Magnitude and Vote Seeking."

Chapters

  • Taylor, Steven, Felipe Botero, and Brian F. Crisp. Forthcoming. "Pre-Candidates, Candidates, and Presidents:Paths to the Colombian Presidency." In Pathways to Power: Candidate Selection and Political Recruitment in Latin America, ed. Scott Morgenstern and Peter Siavelis. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2006. "The Nature of Representation in Andean Legislatures and Attempts at Institutional Reengineering." In The Crisis of Democratic Representation in the Andes, ed. Scott Mainwaring, Ana María Bejarano, and Eduard Pizarro. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Daniel H. Levine, and José E. Molina. 2003. "The Rise and Decline of COPEI in Venezuela." In Christian Democracy in Latin America, ed. Scott Mainwaring and Timothy R. Scully, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Erika Moreno, Brian F. Crisp, and Matthew Soberg Shugart. 2003. "The Accountability Deficit in Latin America." In Democratic Accountability in Latin America, ed. Scott Mainwaring and Christopher Welna, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Daniel H. Levine. 2001. "Democratizing the Democracy: Crisis and Reform in Venezuela." In Mexico, Central and South America: New Perspectives Volume 2: Democracy, ed. Jorge I Dominguez, London: Routledge. (Also appears as an article listed above.)
  • Crisp, Brian F. and Gregg B. Johnson. 2001. "De instituciones que restringen a instituciones ausentes." In Venezuela en transición: elecciones y democracia 1998-2000, ed. José Vicente Carrasquero, Thais Maingon, and Federico Welsch. Caracas: CDB Publicaciones.
  • Crisp, Brian F., and Juan Carlos Rey. 2001. "The Causes of Electoral Reform in Venezuela." In Mixed-member Electoral Systems: The Best of Both Worlds?, ed. Matthew Soberg Shugart and Martin P. Wattenberg, New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Kulisheck, Michael, and Brian F. Crisp. 2001. "The Consequences of Electoral Reform in Venezuela." In Mixed-member Electoral Systems: The Best of Both Worlds?, ed. Matthew Soberg Shugart and Martin P. Wattenberg, Oxford University Press.
  • Levine, Daniel H., and Brian F. Crisp. 1999. "Venezuela: The Character, Crisis and Possible Future of Democracy." In Democracy in Developing Countries: Latin America, 2nd edition, ed. Larry Diamond, Juan J. Linz, Seymour Martin Lipset, and Jonathan Hartlyn. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers. (Also appears as an article listed above.)
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1998. "Presidential Decree Authority in Venezuela." In Executive Decree Authority: Calling Out the Tanks or Filling Out the Forms, ed. John M. Carey and Matthew Soberg Shugart. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1998. "Institutional Design and Compromised Legitimacy." In Reinventing Legitimacy: Democracy and Political Change in Venezuela, ed. Damarys J. Canache and Michael R. Kulisheck. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishers.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1997. "Presidential Behavior in a System with Strong Parties: Venezuela 1958-1995." In Presidentialism and Democracy in Latin America, ed. Scott Mainwaring and Matthew Soberg Shugart. New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1997. "The Venezuelan Congress." In World Encyclopedia of Parliaments and Legislatures, ed. George Kurian. Washington, DC: Congressional Quarterly.
  • Levine, Daniel H., and Brian F. Crisp. 1995. "Legitimacy, Governability, and Institutions in Venezuela." In Lessons of the Venezuelan Experience, ed. Joseph S. Tulchin, Moisés Naím, Louis Goodman, and Johanna Mendelson-Forman. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Daniel H. Levine, and Juan Carlos Rey. 1995. "The Legitimacy Problem." In Venezuelan Democracy Under Stress, ed. Jennifer McCoy, William Smith, Andrés Stambouli, and Andrés Serbin. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Books. (Also appears as an article listed above.)

Other Publications

  • Crisp, Brian F. and Felipe Botero. 2006.  "High Emotion, Little Content: Colombia's Presidential Election."  ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America. Spring.
  • Crisp, Brian F.  2006.  "Colombia 2005."  Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Crisp, Brian F.  2005.  "Colombia 2004."  Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2004. "Review of Legislative Politics in Latin America edited by Scott Morgenstern and Benito Nacif." Journal of Latin American Studies 36(2): 413-414.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2004. "Colombia 2003." Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2003. "Álvaro Uribe Vélez." Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2003. "Colombia 2002." Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2002. "Colombia 2001." Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Johnson, Gregg B. and Brian F. Crisp. 2001. "Review of Legislative Institutions and Ideology in Chile by John B. Londregan." Latin American Politics and Society 43(3): 170-175.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 2001. "Colombia 2000." Britannica Book of the Year.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1998. "Review of Venezuela and the United States by Judith Ewell." The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. 556: 201.
  • Crisp, Brian F. (with others). 1998. "Venezuela." Collier’s Encyclopedia.
  • Crisp, Brian F. (with others). 1998. "Caracas." Collier’s Encyclopedia.
  • Crisp, Brian F. 1997. "Review of Strong Parties and Lame Ducks by Michael Coppedge." Hispanic American Historical Review, 77(1): 146-147.

Research in Progress

  • Individual papers underway:
  • The Place of Decree Authority in Presidential Systems: Theory and Practice
  • Pivotal Politics in Presidential Systems
  • Dimensionality and Agenda Control in the United States House
  • Electoral Institutions and Strategic Voting
  • I am developing a project on  the nature of representation when nationwide, at-large districts are used to elect an entire legislative chamber. I will examine what motivated founders and reformers to establish such districts, what explains the geographic concentration or dispersion of vote patterns for legislative candidates, and the impact of their spatial pattern of support on their hill and home styles.

Talks, Papers, and Conferences:

  • Taylor, Steven L., Felipe Botero, and Brian F. Crisp. "Pre-Candidates, Candidates, and Presidents: Paths to the Colombian Presidency." Paper presented at the 2004 Meeting of the Latin American Studies Association Las Vegas, Nevada, October 7-9, 2004.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Scott W. Desposato, and Kristin L. Kanthak. "Presidential Powers and Policy Stability." Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, September 2-5, 2004.
  • Carrera, Leandro, and Brian F. Crisp. "Presidents' Power to Legislate: Popular Approval, Legislative Pivot Points, and the Use of Presidential Decree Authority." Paper presented at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Chicago, IL, April 15.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Kristin Kanthak, and Jenny Leijonhufvud. "Ideological Proximity vs. Legislative Cohesiveness: Reputation Seeking and Responsible Government in a Multiparty System." Paper presented at the 2003 Annual Meetings of the Public Choice Society, Nashville, TN, March 11-14.
  • Crisp, Brian F., Erika Moreno, and Matthew Soberg Shugart. "Principles, Agents, Checks, and Balances." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, Philadelphia, PA, August 28-31, 2003.
  • Shugart, Matthew Soberg, Brian F. Crisp, and Erika Moreno. "Re-Constituting Democracy." Paper presented at the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association Political Economy Network IV Meeting, Cartagena, Colombia September 26-27, 2002. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F, and Leslie Schwindt-Bayer. "Discipline Under Duress: Party Discipline in Periods of Institutional Formation." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, August 29-September 1, 2002.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Electoral Reform and Representation in Colombia." Paper presented at the Departamento de Planeación, Ministerio de Interior, Bogotá, Colombia, July 5, 2002.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Personal v. Party Vote Seeking in Colombia and Venezuela." Paper presented at the Instituto Universitario de Pesquisas do Rio de Janeiro (cosponsor Centre for Brazilian Studies, University of Oxford) conference Political Reform in Comparative Perspective. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 27-28, 2002.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Electoral Reform and Representation in Colombia." Paper presented at the Departament de Ciencia Politica, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, June 25, 2002.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Mandates, Powers, and Policies." Paper presented at the Centro de Estudios de Desarollo Economico, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia, June 4, 2002.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Andean Legislatures." Paper presented at the Kellogg Center, University of Notre Dame Conference on The Crisis of Democratic Representation in the Andes, South Bend, IN, May 13-14, 2002.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Political and Economic Reform in the Andes." Paper presented at the Social Science Research Council Conference on Crisis in the Andes, Raleigh-Durham, NC, September 10-11, 2001.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Impact of Candidate Selection Processes on Legislator Behavior in Venezuela." Paper presented at the Latin American Studies Association XXIII International Congress, Washington, DC, September 6-8, 2001.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Impact of the 1999 Constitution on Presidential Legislative Powers in Venezuela." Paper presented at the Society for Latin American Studies Annual Conference, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, England, April 6-8, 2001.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Electoral Reform and Personal Vote Seeking in the Colombian Legislature." Paper presented at the Western Political Science Association 2001 Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, March 15-17, 2001.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Programmatic v. Parochial Bill Initiation in Six Latin American Democracies." Paper presented at the Conference on the Comparative Study of Deputy "Hill Sytle" in Latin American Legislatures, College Station, TX, February 23-24, 2001.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Electoral Mandates, Constitutionally Allocated Powers, and the Adoption of Neoliberal Economic Policy." Talk given at Rice University, Houston, TX, February 22, 2001. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Programmatic v. Parochial Bill Initiation in Six Latin American Democracies." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, August 31-September 3, 2000.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Institutional Rules and Legislative Entrepreneurship in Venezuela and Colombia." Paper presented at the Latin American Studies Association XXII International Congress, Miami, FL, March 16-18, 2000. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Democratic Institutional Design: The Powers and Incentives of Venezuelan Politicians and Interest Groups." Paper presented at the Latin American Studies Association XXII International Congress, Miami, FL, March 16-18, 2000.
  • Crisp Brian F. "Political Reform and Democratic Stability Venezuela." Talk given at the University of New Mexico, February 11, 2000. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. and Gregg B. Johnson. "The Political Determinants of Structural Adjustment." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, September 2-5, 1999.
  • Crisp Brian F. "Legislative Entrepreneurship in Colombia and Venezuela." Talk given to the Social Sciences faculty of the Universidad de Los Andes, Bogota, Colombia, July 13, 1999. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Causes of Electoral Reform in Venezuela." Paper presented at the conference Mixed Electoral Systems: Accounting for the Causes and Consequences of a Worldwide Trend in Electoral Reforms, Newport Beach, CA, December 11-13, 1998. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Variation in Legislative Entrepreneurship in Presidential Systems: Data From Beyond the U.S. Case." Paper presented at the Latin American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, September 24-26, 1998.
  • Levine, Daniel H. and Brian F. Crisp. "Venezuela: The Character, Crisis and Possible Future of Democracy." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting , Boston, MA September 3-6, 1998.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Democratic Institutions and Government Spending in Latin America." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting , Washington, DC, August 28- 31, 1997.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Venezuelan Electoral System and Interbranch Relations." Paper presented at the Latin American Studies Association Annual Meeting , Guadalajara, Mexico April 17-19, 1997.
  • Crisp, Brian F. and Michael J. Kelly. "The Impact of Structural Adjustment in Latin America." Paper presented at the Western Political Science Association Annual Meeting , Tucson, AZ March 13-15, 1997.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Policy-making Process in Venezuela and Prospects for Reform." Talk given at the Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas, Venezuela, May 28, 1996. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Institutional Design and the Crisis of Democracy in Venezuela." Paper presented at the conference Compromised Legitimacy?: Assessing the Crisis of Democracy in Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, May 9-11, 1996. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Democracy as a Whole: Causal Links Among the Stages of Democratic Rule." Paper presented at the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, April 23, 1996. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Institutional Sources of Crisis and Reconsolidation." Talk given at the public forum Democracy in Venezuela: Crisis and Future Prospects sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, November 13, 1995. (Invited)
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Development and Democracy: An Empirical Study of Business and Labor Participation in a Developing Democracy." Paper presented at the Latin American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, September 28-30, 1995.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Developing State in a Period of Privatization and Neoliberal Reform." Paper presented at the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting , Chicago, IL, August 31-September 3, 1995.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "When Executives Legislate: Presidential Decree Authority and the Nature of Democracy in Latin America (with empirical evidence from Venezuela)." Paper presented at Southern Political Science Association Annual Meeting , Atlanta, GA, November 2-5, 1994.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "The Rigidity of Democratic Institutions and the Current Legitimacy Crisis in Venezuela." Paper presented at the North Carolina Political Science Association Annual Meeting "The Struggle for Democracy at Home and Abroad," Durham, NC, April 2-3, 1993.
  • Crisp Brian F., Daniel H. Levine, and Juan Carlos Rey. "The Legitimacy Problem." Paper presented at the North/South Center (University of Miami) and Instituto Venezolano de Estudios Sociales y Políticos Conference "Democracia Bajo Presión: Política y Mercado en Venezuela," Caracas, Venezuela, November 9-11, 1992.
  • Levine, Daniel H. and Brian F. Crisp. "Governability, Legitimacy, and Institutions: The World Turned Upside Down." Paper presented at the Woodrow Wilson Center Conference, "Lessons of the Venezuela Experience," Washington, D.C., October 19-21, 1992.
  • Crisp, Brian F. "Tyranny by the Minority: Institutional Control of Participation in the Venezuelan Democracy," Paper presented at the 1992 Latin American Studies Association Convention in Los Angeles, CA, September 24-27, 1992.

Grants and Awards:

  • "Representation in Nationwide, At-Large Districts" 2004, Weidenbaum Center on the Economy, Government, and Public Policy at Washington University in St. Louis (support for undergraduate assistants, graduate assistant, and travel to the Netherlands, the Philippines, and Slovakia).
  • "Representation in a Nationwide, At-Large District," 2002, Fulbright Scholar Program, Washington, D.C. (support for three months of research in Colombia).
  • "Mapping Political Representation," 2000, Center for Applied Spatial Analysis (CASA), Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. (GIS trained graduate research assistant).
  • "Dissertation Research: Process and Project of Decentralization in Federal and Unitary States in Latin America," 1999, National Science Foundation, Division of Social, Behavioral and Economic Research, Social and Political Science Program, Washington, D.C., Grant # 9905295. Dissertation Adviser.
  • "Variation in Legislative Entrepreneurship in Presidential Systems: Data from Beyond the U.S. Case," 1997-1999, National Science Foundation, Division of Social, Behavioral andEconomic Research, Social and Political Science Program, Washington, D.C., Grant # 9708936. Primary Investigator.
  • "Female Legislators in Latin America," Summer Grant Development Stipend, Summer 1996, Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
  • "Democratic Institutions and Government Spending in Latin America," Latin America Area Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ. (funds to employ graduate research assistant, Summer 1997).
  • Democratic Institutional Design: The Powers and Incentives of Venezuelan Politicians and Interest Groups, Junior Sabbatical, Fall 1996, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
  • "Legislator Behavior in the Americas," Summer Grant Development Stipend, Summer 1996, Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
  • "‘Pork’ or Party Line: Legislator Behavior in the Americas," Research Travel Grant, Spring 1996, Latin American Area Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
  • "Democracy as a Whole: Causal Links Among the Stages of Democratic Rule," Visiting Faculty Fellow, Spring 1996, The Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies; University of Notre Dame; Notre Dame, IN.

Teaching

Teaching Objectives:

In each of my courses I have two basic objectives. First, I want to convey to my students a certain body of key concepts and information. Within the discipline there is not complete agreement on the subject's core concepts, and as a result I treat material from a variety of perspectives. Students are encouraged to consider individual, organizational, and societal levels of analysis. Second, I want students to think about posing testable questions and how to design the means of answering them. It often takes undergraduates some time to comprehend that political science is not about defending normative positions, it is instead about accumulating a body of knowledge. When students are explicitly focused on theoretical perspectives, they are better prepared to continue their explorations of politics either as participants in another class or on their own.

When I first started to teach, I thought that the best way to obtain these objectives was to present students with as much knowledge as possible through a combination of lectures and readings. After some frustration in the classroom I attended a series of workshops on teaching undergraduates and recognized that I was not fostering "active learners." In my classes students were encouraged to be passive receivers of the knowledge I was supposedly imparting. What I learned in the workshops and have since experienced myself is that students retain more knowledge and understand it at a greater depth when you, as a teacher, help them discover it for themselves. What I try to do now is lead students to a set of conceptual tools and a critical way of thinking which will help them grasp the political world. I refer to this set of tools as the "comparative method" — it is little more than the basic model of scientific inquiry adapted to reflect the particularities of political science.

The process of creating active learners is not the same across lower division, upper division, and graduate courses. While the process varies in a number of ways, the most basic difference is the balance between induction and deduction. Beginning a course by introducing first and second year undergraduates to abstract concepts and theories is fruitless. At best they will commit what you say to memory and at worst they will skip your class altogether. On the other hand, engaging students with the fascinating facts surrounding the overthrow of Anastasio Somoza in Nicaragua, the establishment of a Marxist regime under the Sandinistas, and its eventual electoral defeat by a moderate, right-of-center coalition can keep them interested for a good part of the semester. What is more, these historical events also provide the means of talking about larger concepts such as variation in land tenure systems and how they create or fail to create peasant support for revolutionary movements. Abstract concepts like "land tenure systems" have meaning to lower division students only if they arrive at them inductively by talking about particular cases at particular points in time and variations among them. At the graduate level, on the other hand, students are ready to talk about theoretical generalizations and abstract concepts. Rather than lead them to these inductively, it is possible to make them active learners by asking them to deduce from these concepts concrete means of operationalizing them and empirical evidence for testing their explanatory power. They can then debate the theoretical and methodological merits of competing scholarly analyses and begin to form research agendas of their own. Regardless of the level of the student, the goal remains creating an active learner with the ability to pursue interesting questions on his or her own, but the means of doing this varies across the courses I teach.

Teaching Awards:

  • Graduate College Graduate Education Teaching and Mentoring Award, 2000, Recognized for graduate teaching and mentoring at the University of Arizona.
  • College of Social and Behavioral Sciences Overall Most Distinguished Teaching Award, 1998-1999, Recognized for all-around (graduate and undergraduate) teaching contributions in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Arizona.
  • Five-Star Faculty of the Year Award, 1998, Recognized for undergraduate instruction at the University of Arizona by a panel of students after being nominated by students, submitting teaching materials, several classroom visits, and an extensive interview process.

Teaching Interests:



  • Comparative Politics


Introduction to Comparative Politics; Comparative Development; Government

and Politics of Latin America; Democratization; Institutional Design

  • Methodology


Introduction to Political Science; Social Science Methods; Research Design


Service

Professional Service:

  • Referee of journal articles for: American Journal of Political Science, Bulletin of Latin American Research, Comparative Political Studies, Comparative Politics, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Electoral Studies, International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Latin American Politics and Society, Journal of Latin American Studies, Journal of Politics, Journal of Public Policy, Latin American Research Review, Party Politics, Political Research Quarterly, Southeastern Political Review, Studies in Comparative International Development, and World Development.
  • Editorial Review Board; Latin American Research Review; March 2000 to Present.
  • National Screening Committee, Institute of International Education, evaluate graduate student proposals for Fulbright funded study in South America, 2003-2004, 2004-2005, 2005-2006.
  • Consultant; US State Department; "Venezuela’s New Constitution." Presented a paper. Washington, D.C., 2000, (Remunerated).
  • Consultant, Mexican Chamber of Deputies, "The Role of Congress in Venezuela and Colombia." Two presentations in a professionalization seminar for members of congress and staff.
  • Consultant; Meridian International Center; "Democratic Institutional Design: Political Reform and Restoring Venezuelan Democracy" Presented a paper. Washington, D.C., 1999, (Remunerated).
  • Consultant; US Department of State; "From Stability to Instability in Venezuela and Is There a Road Back Again", US State Department, Presented a paper. Washington, D.C., 1999, (Remunerated).
  • Consultant; Cohen and Woods International, "International Humanitarian Relief to Venezuela: Surge Training Exercise." Presented a paper; served as a resource person during the simulation; evaluated the effectiveness of the simulation. Carlisle, PA, June 23-25, 1998 (Remunerated).
  • Consultant; Latin America Research Bureau, U.S. Department of State; "The Health of Venezuelan Democracy." Presented a paper. Washington, DC, September 11, 1998 (Remunerated).
  • Executive Committee; Political Institutions Section of the Latin American Studies Association; (also manage group’s listserv); 1996 to 1998.
  • Co-President; Political Institutions Section of the Latin American Studies Association; (also manage groups listserv); 1998 to 2000.
  • Executive Committee; Venezuelan Studies Section of the Latin American Studies Association; 1997 to 1999.

University and Department Service:

  • Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Political Science, University of Arizona, Fall 2000 to July 2004.
  • Member of the Graduate Council, University of Arizona, Fall 2003 to July 2004.
  • Member of the Executive Committee, Department of Political Science, University of Arizona, Fall 1996 to July 2004.
  • Member of the Research Policy Committee, University of Arizona, Fall 2001 to the Fall 2003.
  • Member of the Advisory Board, Latin America Area Center, University of Arizona, Fall 1999 to the present.
  • Member of a Tenure and Promotion Committee, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, College of the Humanities, University of Arizona, Fall 2002.
  • Member of the Review Committee, Provost’s Author Support Fund, University of Arizona, Fall 2000.
  • Member of the Sunset Review Committee, Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, University of Arizona, Fall 2000.
  • Member of the Advisory Board, Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Institute, University of Arizona, Fall 1999 to Spring 2001.
  • Member of the Recruitment/Search Committee, Department of Political Science, University of Arizona, Fall 1999.
  • Colloquium Director, Department of Political Science, University of Arizona, Fall 1998 to the present.
  • Member of the Travel Grants Committee, Latin American Studies, University of Arizona, Fall 1996 to Fall 1998.
  • Discussant on the Panel "The Struggle for the Implementation of Participatory Democracy in Colombia", Visiting Delegation from Universidad de Los Andes, University of Arizona, Summer 1995.
  • Faculty Advisor to the Wake Forest chapter of the Golden Key National Honor Society.
  • Faculty Advisor to the Wake Forest chapter of Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity.
  • Chair of the Search Committee in Comparative Politics, Department of Politics, Wake Forest University.
  • Chair of the Honors Committee, Department of Politics, Wake Forest University.
  • Instructor for Leadership in the 21st Century, Admissions Office, Wake Forest University.
  • Instructor for "PowerUp!" Computer Camp, Wake Forest University.

Community Service:

  • "Democracy and Markets in Latin America", Lecture in the Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Series, Country Club of La Cholla, Tucson, AZ, March 2, 1999.
  • "Democracy and Markets in Latin America", Lecture in the Foreign Policy Association Great Decisions Series, Jewish Community Center, Tucson, AZ, March 19, 1999.
  • Lecturer in the Critical Issues Adult Education Series.
  • Lecturer at the Shepherd Center's Adventures in Learning Adult Education Series.
  • Volunteer at the After-School Homework Program, Residents Against Involvement with Drugs, Winston-Salem Housing Authority.